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Psi Chi Journal Summer 1997

PSI CHI Journal of Psychological Research
Volume 2.2 | Summer 1997

RESEARCH ARTICLES

Birth Order Position and the Occurrence of Perceived Parental Favoritism
Susan Burns and Michelle Peter, Emporia State University

ABSTRACT: Eighty-six college students completed a questionnaire concerning the occurrence of perceived parental favoritism and their birth order position. The participants also rated their feeling about parents’ warmth and acceptance. Conflicting results notwithstanding, it was hypothesized that birth order position was related to perceived parental favoritism. This prediction was partially supported. However, a significant difference was found between warmth of mothers and fathers; mothers were rated as displaying more warmth than fathers.

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The Effect of Elusiveness on Dating Preferences:
Is Playing Hard to Get the Best Strategy?

Kelly A. Traynor and Harvey R. Freeman, Ohio Wesleyan University

ABSTRACT: Seventy-one college students participated in a study that investigated the effect of degree of elusiveness by prospective dating partners on a participant’s desire to date the prospective partners. During the first session, participants filled out a background information sheet and a personality questionnaire. During the second session, participants received four folders that described prospective dates, two of whom supposedly had been randomly matched with the participant and two of whom supposedly had been computer matched. These matches differed in elusiveness: easy to get, hard to get, selectively hard to get, and no information available. Participants rated each prospective date as to their level of desire to go out with the prospective dates, and chose the one they most wanted to go out with. The results showed the selectively hard-to-get choice was preferred by both men and women.

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Individual and Family Characteristics of Juvenile Sexual Offenders
Heather Plager and Eric Landrum, Boise State University

ABSTRACT: Descriptive data on 100 juveniles seen for assessment and treatment at a nonprofit, community-based, outpatient treatment program for sexual abuse are presented. Prior physical and sexual abuse characteristics of the juvenile sexual offender (JSO) are discussed as well as the incidence of victimization and perpetration within the offender’s family. Statistically significant associations emerged for the following characteristics: (a) prior physical and sexual victimization of the offender and having another family member identified as a perpetrator of sexual abuse; (b) prior sexual victimization of the offender and prior sexual victimization of another family member; and (c) a history of sexual abuse of the offender and having a family member with prior sexual victimization.

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Males' Resolution of Conflict in Relation to Reasoning and Sex Role Charactersitcs
Sharon A. Braun and Rickard A. Sebby, Southeast Missouri State University

ABSTRACT: Men’s perception and resolutions of role conflict with regard to occupation, societal demands, intimate relationships, and familial goals were examined relative to cognitive reasoning and sex role characteristics. Forty-five male undergraduate students ranging in age from 18 to 43 (M = 21.87, SD = 6.00) volunteered to participate in the study. Results indicated that men who scored high in feminine sex role characteristics generally perceived less conflict in relation to career or family issues. Conversely, men who scored high in absolute reasoning and high in masculine characteristics were likely to perceive more conflict in a romantic relationship in which career and family issues were at odds. These results are discussed in relation to men’s evolving gender roles and possible gender differences in reasoning.

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Familial Dysfunction but not Parental Alcoholism Reflected in Psychopathology
and Attachment Patterns Among College Students

Kimberley Conway, Michele Coro, Barbara Waldron, and John Broida,
University of Southern Maine


ABSTRACT: Adult children of alcoholics (ACOAs) often come from dysfunctional homes. Many traits attributed to ACOAs may also be evident in children from nonalcoholic but otherwise dysfunctional families. To the extent that parental alcoholism has unique effects, ACOAs may exhibit patterns different from those from otherwise dysfunctional homes. Two studies were conducted to examine the impact of parental alcoholism and familial dysfunction on scales of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-II (MCMI-II), patterns of attachment to caregivers, and perceived social support from friends and family. Familial dysfunction was reþected in many characteristics attributed to ACOAs, including distrust, antisocial behavior, and psychopathology. Parental alcoholism was not found to have any unique impact on these variables in our samples of college students. Traits linked to parental alcoholism may reflect dysfunction in the family of origin rather than parental alcoholism per se.

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Writing, Revising, and Writing Again: Preparing a Manuscript for Publication
Richard L. Miller, University of Nebraska at Kearney

ABSTRACT: This editorial provides an overview of what to expect when having a manuscript reviewed by this journal, including suggestions for how to prepare your manuscript. Also discussed are the roles of the faculty mentor, the managing editor, and the manuscript reviewers. Particular emphasis is placed on typical editorial problems encountered in each section of an empirical study. Examples of how to correct those problems are presented. Finally, readers will find suggestions for revising and resubmitting manuscripts.

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The Psi Chi Journal of Psychological Research educates, supports, and promotes professional development, and disseminates psychological science. Only original, empirical manuscripts that make a contribution to psychological knowledge are published. Authors are Psi Chi members at the undergraduate, graduate, and faculty level.

 

 

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