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Psi Chi Journal Spring 2000

PSI CHI Journal of Psychological Research
Volume 5.1 | Spring 2000

RESEARCH ARTICLES

An Examination of the Impact of Parental Divorce on Students'
Attitudes About Marriage

Camille Spink and Michelle E. Boyer-Pennington, Middle Tennessee State University

ABSTRACT: The present study examined the effects of parental divorce on college students' attitudes toward marriage. Two hundred and five college students from intact, single-divorce, and multiple-divorce homes completed a version of Wallin (1954) and Kinnaird and Gerrard's (1986) Attitudes Toward Marriage Scale (ATMS) and answered questions about their age, sex, and parents' marital status. Students from divorced homes did not have less favorable attitudes toward marriage, and students from single- and multiple-divorce homes did not differ in their personal reactions to their biological parents' divorce(s). Thus, the hypothesis that students who experienced multiple parental divorces would have more negative attitudes toward marriage was not supported.

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Teacher Management Styles and Child Characteristics Influence
Likelihood of Referral for ADHD

Rebecca L. Vereb, Westminster College

ABSTRACT: Factors affecting teachers' ratings of children with ADHD were examined. Teachers (N = 118) completed several questionnaires regarding their perceptions of the behavior of a hypothetical child with ADHD. Factor analysis of the Child Behavior Profile and Questionnaire revealed 3 factors, Teacher's Self-Efficacy, Teacher's Perceived Need for Additional Assistance, and Teacher's Rating of Behavior. Three 2 x 2 x 2 factorial ANOVAs examined the influence of teacher's management style (autonomous vs. controlling), sex of child, and primary symptoms (hyperactive-impulsive vs. inattentive) on each of the 3 factors. Results indicated that teachers believed that hyperactive girls would be more manageable than hyperactive boys. Also, autonomy-oriented teachers felt that the child in the profile required additional assistance beyond the typical classroom more often than control-oriented teachers. Finally, hyperactive behaviors were rated as more problematic than inattentive behaviors.

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Relating Pretrial Publicity, Judicial Instruction, and Thought
Suppression With Guilt Ratings

Vania M. Gauthreaux, Tulane University

ABSTRACT: Pretrial publicity may bias potential jurors and impair a defendant's ability to receive a fair trial. One way the court attempts to remedy the bias potentially created by pretrial publicity is by judicial instruction to disregard it. However, some studies have shown that this admonishment may actually have a bias-intensifying effect. The present study sought to explain that phenomenon in terms of thought suppression. Participants assuming the role of mock jurors were exposed to relevant or irrelevant pretrial publicity and were given either an instruction or no instruction to disregard it. The results supported the hypothesis that attempts to disregard the relevant prejudicial information would initiate a cycle of thought suppression and increase participants' bias toward the defendant.

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Factors Contributing to Sex Differences on the Mental Rotation Task
Janet Luehring and Joanne D. Altman, Washburn University

ABSTRACT: Research on spatial abilities suggests sex differences in task performance. The present study explored 3 spatial ability performance factors (i.e., time, choice, and expectation) to examine if this sex difference could be mediated. Participants were 160 undergraduates assigned to 1 of 8 groups. We scored each participant on the number of correct and incorrect answers on the Mental Rotation Test designed by Vandenberg and Kuse (1978). Correct scores yielded significant main effects for sex, time, and choice with an interaction between time and choice, as well as sex, time, and choice. Incorrect scores yielded significant main effects for sex and time with an interaction between sex and time. Both women and men improved performance when time constraints were eliminated or when forced to answer.

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The Psi Chi Journal of Psychological Research educates, supports, and promotes professional development, and disseminates psychological science. Only original, empirical manuscripts that make a contribution to psychological knowledge are published. Authors are Psi Chi members at the undergraduate, graduate, and faculty level.

 

 

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