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Psi Chi Journal Winter 1997

PSI CHI Journal of Psychological Research
Volume 2.4 | Winter 1997

RESEARCH ARTICLES

The Effects of Mood on Task Performance and Task Satisfaction
Doreen Cicchetti, Kathleen Moyer, and Jeffrey P. Nicholas, Muhlenberg College

ABSTRACT: This study investigated the influence that mood states have on task performance and task satisfaction. Forty-four undergraduate students underwent either a positive or negative mood induction procedure and then worked on an anagram task. Mood, task satisfaction, and task performance were assessed. Results showed that mood influenced participants’ satisfaction with the task: participants in the positive mood condition reported more satisfaction with the task than participants in the negative mood condition. Mood did not influence performance on the anagram task. The results are discussed in relation to implications for the understanding of job satisfaction and for the measurement of job satisfaction in organizations.

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The Effects of Time-Incremented Running on Mood State of College Athletes
Cheryl J. Hansen, Kevin Moses, and Chad Gardner, University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh

ABSTRACT: The hypothesis that time-incremented running is a factor affecting mood state was tested on 41 members of men’s and women’s college track teams. Mood Thermometers (Tuckman, 1988) measured the difference in tension, anger, depression, fatigue, and confusion immediately before and right after running sessions of 0, 15, 30, or 45 min. Completely randomized 2 x 4 (Sex x Length of Running Time) analyses of variance indicated a significant decrease in running groups as compared to the no-run group in women in terms of depression, tension, and confusion. Men did not show significant improvements in any of these areas and, in fact, showed significantly greater confusion following a running session of 45 min.

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Using Senior Exit Surveys and Alumni Surveys to Assess the Quality
of an Undergraduate Psychology Degree Program

Mary B. Bickes, Valerie W. Lawrence, and Linda M. Noble, Kennesaw St. University

ABSTRACT: This study evaluated the psychology undergraduate program at a large regional state university using four measures: (a) a senior exit survey administered to psychology seniors in 1994 and 1995, and (b) an alumni survey administered to psychology alumni in 1992 and 1995. Alumni responding to the surveys attended the university between 1981 and 1994. Results indicated that students and alumni are satisfied with the quality of teaching in the department and with the knowledge and skills they developed; however, respondents indicated it was difficult to obtain employment with a bachelor’s degree alone, and they desired more research and applied experiences in psychology.

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The Effect of Advertising Cues on Consumers' Recall Rate
of Celebrity Endorsements

Nicole Hutton, Arkansas State University

ABSTRACT: To determine if recall of celebrity advertisements is dependent on the type (celebrity or brand name) or number (one or two) of advertising cues, participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 conditions. The celebrity condition considered recall of brand names when given the celebrity cue(s), and the brand-name condition examined recall of celebrity endorsers when given the brand-name cue(s). No difference was found in recall based on type or number of cues given. However, male celebrities were recalled significantly (p = .001) more than female celebrities. Also, male participants recalled male celebrities better, and female participants recalled female celebrities better (p < .001). Results are discussed in terms of congruence between the celebrity and the product being endorsed.

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Female and Male Postformal Reasoning in Relation to
Feminine and Masculine Characteristics

Sharon A. Braun and Rickard A. Sebby, Southeast Missouri State University

ABSTRACT: This study examined pathways between postformal reasoning, sex role characteristics, and environmental factors. Thirty-two female and 29 male undergraduate college students participated. A demographic questionnaire assessed age, sex, marital status, family structure, family income when growing up, female and male siblings, education level, and expected salary upon graduation. The Social Paradigm Belief Inventory (Kramer, Kahlbaugh, & Goldston, 1992) assessed absolute, relativistic, and dialectical reasoning. The Bem Sex Role Inventory (Bem, 1974) assessed participants’ masculine and feminine sex role factors. Relationships existed between age find reasoning and between certain sex role characteristics and types of reasoning. A path or link connects one’s family income while growing up to endorsement of certain sex role characteristics which, in turn, leads to particular types of reasoning.

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The Psi Chi Journal of Psychological Research educates, supports, and promotes professional development, and disseminates psychological science. Only original, empirical manuscripts that make a contribution to psychological knowledge are published. Authors are Psi Chi members at the undergraduate, graduate, and faculty level.

 

 

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