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Psi Chi Journal Winter 1998

PSI CHI Journal of Psychological Research
Volume 3.4 | Winter 1998

RESEARCH ARTICLES

MRI Volumetric Analysis of the Amygdala and Hippocampus Involving Verbal Memory in Parkinson's Patients
Christopher W. DeLisle, Mark A. Eckert, Tim H. Lucas, and Dawn Bowers, Psychobiology Research Institute, University of Florida

ABSTRACT: This study attempted to determine if patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) have smaller hippocampi and amygdalae than controls and if the size of these structures predicts verbal memory performance in patients. The amygdalae, hippocampi, and total brain volumes of 7 patients with PD were measured and compared with 7 controls. There were no significant differences in the volume of the amygdala and hippocampus for the 2 groups. The PD patients were also given the Hopkins Verbal Memory Test to determine the relation between verbal memory performance and volume of brain structures. Their scores were compared within the group for performance. A larger right hippocampus was related to impaired performance on the false-positive portion of the test. These results question the extent to which PD effects verbal memory performance in patients.

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The Link Between Procrastination, Delay of Gratification, and Life Satisfaction:
A Preliminary Analysis

Lauren M. Caldwell and Robert R. Mowrer, Angelo State University

ABSTRACT: A preliminary study which attempted to address anxiety and regret as two intervening variables that link procrastination, but not delay of gratification, to life satisfaction is reported. Regression (path) analysis indicated that much of procrastination’s effect on life satisfaction was mediated through anxiety and regret. Delay of gratification did not have a significant effect on life satisfaction via anxiety but did through regret. Results are discussed in terms of when delay of gratification involves anxiety and when it does not.

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Regional Differences in Dendritic and Spine Complexity: A Quantitative
Golgi Analysis of Human Cerebral Cortex

Melissa Prather and Bob Jacobs, The Colorado College; Matthew Schall,
Global Business Intelligence Solutions

ABSTRACT: Regional variation in dendritic and spine complexity was examined by quantifying the basilar dendritic systems of supragranular pyramidal cells in 8 functionally distinct regions of human cerebral cortex. Ten cells from each region were quantified (N = 640) with a Neurolucida computer–microscope interface system (Microbrightfield, Inc.). Based on Benson’s (1994) functional hierarchy, regions were grouped as low integration (primary and unimodal cortex) and high integration (heteromodal and supramodal cortex). Low-integration regions included Brodmann’s area (BA) 3-1-2, BA 4, BA 22, and BA 44. High-integration regions included BA 6ß, BA 39, BA 10, and BA 11. The effects of Brodmann’s areas and integration level were evaluated using repeated-measures factorial designs. The results indicated that dendritic complexity in high-integration regions was significantly greater than in low-integration areas for all dependent measures. These findings further support the relationship between dendritic complexity and regional processing abilities, and help to establish a hierarchy of morphological complexity across distinct cortical regions.

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Something in the Way She Moves: The Influence of Shoe-Altered Gait on Motion
And Trait Impressions of Women

Kathy D. Walter, Sheila Brownlow, Sammi L. Ervin, and Nicole Williamson,
Catawba College


ABSTRACT: Because information about traits and characteristics is conveyed by physical motion, the way people walk affects our judgments of others. This study examined how women’s gaits are affected by high heels, and how subsequent impressions of women change based on movement-altering footwear. To isolate motion from other nonverbal cues, the point-light technique (Johansson, 1973) was used to film women walking barefooted and in high heels. This procedure produced displays of moving dots against a black background. Judgments of motion and traits revealed that the gaits of women wearing high heels were stiffer and included less hip sway and arm swing. More importantly, women in heels were perceived as more submissive than when barefoot, although they were also judged as less sexy. Perceived age of the walkers and knowledge of their sex did not alter these perceptions. Thus, high heels make women appear to be physically passive and seem more submissive.

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Hallucinogenic Drug Use and Personal Belief in Paranormal Phenomena
Melissa Garthwaite and John Broida, University of Soutehrn Maine;
Joe Miele, Easter Stroudsburg University


ABSTRACT: Use of marijuana has been linked to belief in extrasensory perception (ESP) and other paranormal phenomena. We examined the possibility that such acceptance is characteristic of users of other types of hallucinogens. We also explored acceptance of other paranormal phenomena in relation to drug use. In Study 1, surveys were distributed to university students; in Study 2, a snowball sample of acquaintances was used to diversify the group surveyed. Results indicated there is no significant relationship between use of serotonergic hallucinogens and acceptance of ESP. Furthermore, no link was observed between marijuana use and belief in ESP. Belief in other paranormal experiences, including telepathy and aura, was related to the use of hallucinogenic agents. Factors other than use of hallucinogenic agents may be more important in creating a belief in the paranormal.

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The Psi Chi Journal of Psychological Research educates, supports, and promotes professional development, and disseminates psychological science. Only original, empirical manuscripts that make a contribution to psychological knowledge are published. Authors are Psi Chi members at the undergraduate, graduate, and faculty level.

 

 

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